Category Archives: News

18Sep/19

FAO provides emergency livestock response for drought-affected communities in Ethiopia

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Ethiopia

Funded by CERF and ECHO, FAO is carrying out treatment campaigns and helping households to sell their animals to generate cash and reduce pressure on limited available pasture.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is providing immediate livestock protectionto drought-affected pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in Ethiopia.

Funded by the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund (UN CERF) and the Humanitarian Aid Department of the European Commission (ECHO), FAO is carrying out treatment campaigns and helping households to sell their animals to generate cash and reduce pressure on limited available pasture. Communities are also being provided with livestock feed and cash transfers to meet other essential needs. Meanwhile FAO has been raising awareness on the Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards (LEGS), a key handbook for designing, implementing and assessing livestock interventions to assist people affected by humanitarian crises.

Sending off a consignment of veterinary drugs from the capital Addis Ababa to the Oromia and Somali regions, Dr. Alemayehu Mekonnen, Chief Veterinary Officer from the Ministry of Agriculture, thanked FAO for the intervention. He said the Organization has historically played a key role in responding to livestock emergencies and diseases, including the eradication of Rinderpest in Ethiopia. “These veterinary drugs and animal feed will reduce the effects of drought on the pastoral and agro-pastoral livelihoods,” he said.

The livestock sector in Ethiopia is one of the largest in Africa, contributing nearly 20 percent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and 15 percent of export earnings. Livestock are a source of protein-rich food (such as milk, meat, and eggs) and provide income, manure, draught power, fuel and leather. The sector supports the livelihoods of about 80 percent of rural people in Ethiopia.

However, the destructive effects of climate extremes are affecting the well-being, productive and reproductive capacities of the nation’s livestock: recurring droughts and low overall rainfall have impacted forage production, water availability and rangeland vegetation patterns, and are heightening the susceptibility of livestock to diseases. As a result, households’ coping abilities have declined to the point where there is a growing threat to the survival of viable pastoral production systems – and thereby of the communities themselves.

The FAO Representative in Ethiopia, Ms. Fatouma Seid, said the Organization’s interventions are targeting 151 000 households (more than 750 000 people) and would contribute to restoring the health and body conditions of livestock and reduce mortality rates. “Ultimately, the aim is to safeguard livelihoods of the targeted communities and accelerate their recovery from the effects of recurrent drought,” she said.

The “Emergency livestock response to drought-affected pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in Afar, Oromia, Somali and the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’ (SNNP) regions of Ethiopia” project is being implemented in close collaboration with international, regional, and national organizations and Ethiopia’s Ministry of Agriculture.

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18Sep/19

ECHO announces more than €34 million for Great Lakes region

Source: European Commission’s Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Burundi, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, United Republic of Tanzania

Most of the funding supports the DRC (€29.375 million) and refugees from Burundi in Tanzania and Rwanda (€4.3 million). The remainder goes to Burundi and the Congo.

The European Commission has announced €34.275 million in humanitarian funding to help the most vulnerable people in the Great Lakes region in Africa. The aid will mainly help address urgent humanitarian needs in the Democratic Republic of Congo and provide continued support to Burundian refugees in the region.

“_Food insecurity in the Democratic Republic of Congo is worsening the humanitarian situation. We are stepping up support, including in the eastern conflict-torn part of the country, affected by the Ebola epidemic. We also maintain our solidarity with Burundian refugees in the region. Our new aid package will provide emergency healthcare, improve hygiene conditions and access to clean water, provide protection, and give education to children caught in these crises,_” said Christos Stylianides, Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management and EU Ebola coordinator.

The bulk of the funding announced supports humanitarian measures in the Democratic Republic of Congo (€29.375 million) and refugees from Burundi in Tanzania and Rwanda (€4.3 million). The remaining €600,000 are allocated to UN agencies in Burundi and to help refugees from the Democratic Republic of Congo in neighbouring Republic of Congo.

Africa’s Great Lakes region continues to face armed conflicts and insecurity, leading to forced displacements, food shortages and under-nutrition, and recurrent outbreaks of epidemics and natural disasters. The funding announced today brings the overall amount of EU humanitarian aid in the Great Lakes region in 2019 to €69.74 million.

Background

EU-supported projects include giving rapid and flexible aid to conflict-affected people, providing psychosocial support to survivors of gender-based violence, and giving vulnerable communities clean water supply systems.

Given that vulnerable communities are often in hard-to-reach, remote areas that lack infrastructure and with volatile security, the EU facilitates humanitarian work on the ground through its Humanitarian Air Services (ECHO Flight). Since 2017, it has allocated over €7 million each year to the operation of such flight services in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The EU is a significant contributor in the Ebola response in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since the outbreak of the current Ebola epidemic, the EU has mobilised a total of €47 million in EU humanitarian funding in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is also providing experts, making available the ECHO Flight humanitarian air service to help humanitarian work on the ground, supporting vaccine development and research, and supporting the health sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In addition, the EU is providing training in medical evacuations through the EU Civil Protection Mechanism. The EU has already allocated this year €35 million to the Ebola response in the Democratic Republic of Congo and mobilised €465,000 mobilised for Ebola prevention and readiness measures in Burundi.

Burundi‘s political crisis, ongoing since 2015, has triggered a major socio-economic downturn in an already poor and fragile country. The EU supports Burundian refugees in Tanzania and Rwanda.

For More Information

Factsheets: Democratic Republic of Congo; Burundi crisis

Pictures: Fighting against malnutrition in the DRC; Education in conflict-torn DRC; From Burundi to Tanzania: The route to safety

IP/19/5590

Press contacts:

General public inquiries: Europe Direct by phone 00 800 67 89 10 11 or by email

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17Sep/19

Increase in global number of international migrants continues to outpace growth of the world’s population

Source: UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs
Country: Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America, World

The number of international migrants globally reached an estimated 272 million in 2019, an increase of 51 million since 2010, according to new estimates released by the UN today.

Increase in global number of international migrants continues to outpace growth of the world’s population

New York, 17 September–The number of international migrants globally reached an estimated 272 million in 2019, an increase of 51 million since 2010. Currently, international migrants comprise 3.5 per cent of the global population, compared to 2.8 per cent in the year 2000, according to new estimates released by the United Nations today.

The International Migrant Stock 2019, a dataset released by the Population Division of the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) today, provides the latest estimates of the number of international migrants by age, sex and origin for all countries and areas of the world. The estimates are based on official national statistics on the foreign-born or the foreign population obtained from population censuses, population registers or nationally representative surveys.

Mr. Liu Zhenmin, UN Under-Secretary-General for DESA, said that “These data are critical for understanding the important role of migrants and migration in the development of both countries of origin and destination. Facilitating orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people will contribute much to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

In 2019, regionally, Europe hosts the largest number of international migrants (82 million), followed by Northern America (59 million) and Northern Africa and Western Asia (49 million).

At the country level, about half of all international migrants reside in just 10 countries, with the United States of America hosting the largest number of international migrants (51 million), equal to about 19 per cent of the world’s total. Germany and Saudi Arabia host the second and third largest numbers of migrants (13 million each), followed by the Russian Federation (12 million), the United Kingdom (10 million), the United Arab Emirates (9 million), France, Canada and Australia (around 8 million each) and Italy (6 million).

Concerning their place of birth, one-third of all international migrants originate from only ten countries, with India as the lead country of origin, accounting for about 18 million persons living abroad. Migrants from Mexico constituted the second largest “diaspora” (12 million), followed by China (11 million), the Russian Federation (10 million) and the Syrian Arab Republic (8 million).
The share of international migrants in total population varies considerably across geographic regions with the highest proportions recorded in Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand)

(21.2%) and Northern America (16.0%) and the lowest in Latin America and the Caribbean (1.8%),
Central and Southern Asia (1.0%) and Eastern and South-Eastern Asia (0.8%).

Most international migrants move between countries located within the same region. A majority of international migrants in sub-Saharan Africa (89%), Eastern and South-Eastern Asia (83%), Latin America and the Caribbean (73%), and Central and Southern Asia (63 %) originated from the region in which they reside. By contrast, most of the international migrants that lived in Northern America (98%), Oceania (88%) and Northern Africa and Western Asia (59%) were born outside their region of residence.

Forced displacements across international borders continues to rise. Between 2010 and 2017, the global number of refugees and asylum seekers increased by about 13 million, accounting for close to a quarter of the increase in the number of all international migrants. Northern Africa and Western Asia hosted around 46 per cent of the global number of refugees and asylum seekers, followed by sub-Saharan Africa (21%).

Turning to the gender composition, women comprise slightly less than half of all international migrants in 2019. The share of women and girls in the global number of international migrants fell slightly, from 49 per cent in 2000 to 48 per cent in 2019. The share of migrant women was highest in Northern America (52%) and Europe (51%), and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa (47%) and Northern Africa and Western Asia (36%).

In terms of age, one out of every seven international migrants is below the age of 20 years. In 2019, the dataset showed that 38 million international migrants, equivalent to 14 per cent of global migrant population, were under 20 years of age. Sub-Saharan Africa hosted the highest proportion of young persons among all international migrants (27%), followed by Latin America and the Caribbean, and Northern Africa and Western Asia (about 22% each).

Three out of every four international migrants are of working age (20-64 years). In 2019, 202 million international migrants, equivalent to 74 per cent of the global migrant population, were between the ages of 20 and 64. More than three quarters of international migrants were of working age in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia, Europe and Northern America.

About the dataset The International Migrant Stock 2019 presents the results of the 2019 revision of the UN’s estimates of the number of international migrants by age, sex and origin for 232 countries or areas for the midpoint (1 July) of each year: 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015 and 2019.
The 2019 revision of the International Migrant Stock and related materials are available at :
bit.ly/Migration2019

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17Sep/19

Measles vaccination in Niger targets over 4 million children

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Niger, Nigeria

Since the beginning of 2019, the country has registered 9,794 measles cases and 53 deaths. Maradi, Tahoua and Niamey are the most affected regions.

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

ATTACKS AGAINST AID WORKERS PERSIST

Some 188 incidents of insecurity against humanitarian workers were recorded between January and August 2019 compared with 277 in the same period last year. Despite the decrease, the level and severity of the incidents have worsened. Twenty-eight aid workers were wounded between January and August 2019 compared to 13 in 2018, according to the latest OCHA statistics. CAR remains one of the most dangerous contexts for humanitarian workers owing to years of armed violence that have also devastated millions of civilians and left them in dire need of relief assistance.

DR CONGO

ARMED RAIDERS TARGET CIVILIANS IN DJUGU

Armed assailants on 11 September attacked a makeshift displacement camp in a locality in Djugu area in the northeastern Ituri province, killing six people and wounding eight others. The attack was the latest in a series of armed raids in Djugu in the past six months. Nearly 200,000 of the 500,000 people displaced in the region live in makeshift settlements, surviving in abject conditions. UN Humanitarian Coordinator expressed worry over the latest attacks against civilians in Ituri as well as in parts of South Kivu province.

NIGER

FLOODS KILL 57, AFFECT 130,000 PEOPLE

Floods have killed 57 people, affected 130,000 others and damaged over 12,000 houses across the country, the Government reported on 10 September.
Agadez, Maradi and Zinder remain the most affected regions. In 2018, floods killed 45 people and affected 208,000 by the end of September.

MEASLES VACCINATION TARGETS OVER 4 MILLION

The Ministry of Health on 13 September launched a week-long measles vaccination campaign targeting around 4.3 million children across the country. The campaign, supported by UN and other aid organizations, is aimed at children aged 9 – 59 months in eight regions. Since the beginning of 2019, the country has registered 9,794 measles cases and 53 deaths. Maradi, Tahoua and Niamey are the most affected regions. Since 2004, Niger has organized five measles vaccination campaigns, improved surveillance and routine immunization. Despite a significant drop in cases from 63,913 cases in 2004 to 776 in 2016, outbreaks occur every year and measles remains a public health concern.

NIGERIA

22,000 MISSING IN CONFLICT-HIT NORTH-EAST

Around 22,000 Nigerians have been reported as missing to the ICRC during a decade of conflict in north-east Nigeria, the organization reported on 12 September, the highest number of missing persons registered with the ICRC in any country. Nearly 60 per cent were minors at the time they went missing, as families are often separated while fleeing attacks. Others have had loved ones abducted or detained and do not know their whereabouts. The ICRC said it is working with the Nigeria Red Cross and other Red Cross and Red Crescent societies in the region to trace missing people. So far, 367 cases have been solved since ICRC received its first cases in 2013.

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